Diet or Full Fat

Diet

To start off with, diet or lower fat percentage products have been adjusted so they have less calories, sugar or fats. This is for those who are calorie conscious and wish to lower their body weight or prevent excess fat gain. Often this is accomplished especially in drinks, by removing the sugar and substituting it with a chemical alternative. An example of this would be aspartame, which can be found in almost all sugar free or reduced sugar drinks. So what is the harm? They have been linked to increasing the likelihood of you developing certain cancers.

The low fat foods such as butter have also been chemically changed to reduce it. Butter in its natural form is ‘x’ amount of calories so to change it requires specific processes which can be adverse to your health. A general rule is to eat a Neanderthal diet, which briefly is eating the foods that we have eaten for the past few million years or so, avoiding packaged foods and eating natural. Modified foods are, like sweeteners, not good

Shirataki Noodles

Shirataki noodles are made from flour ground from the bulbous root (or corm) of the Konjac plant. This flour is known as konjac flour and is not a carbohydrate like traditional flour. It is 100% soluble fiber which is combined at a ratio of 3% to 97% water to create a solid gel. When left in blocks this gel is called konnyaku. When formed into noodles it is called shirataki which means ‘white waterfall’. Traditional konnyaku is grey in color from the addition of seaweed to the mix.

Konnyaku and Shirataki are effectively calorie free since the human body is incapable of converting fiber into energy. Even if konjac flour were a traditional carbohydrate, a 100 gram serve of shirataki would contain only 12 calories based on the three grams of fiber it contains and the fact that one gram of carbohydrate contains four calories.

Most of the health benefits of shirataki are derived from the fiber content. The American Dietetic Association recommends 20-35 grams fiber per day. The average American only consumes around 15 grams of fiber per

Vegan Lunch Recipes

Veggie burger/lentil burger

Assembling a veggie or lentil burger is a healthy, easy and super delicious vegan lunch idea. Find a brand of vegan patties that you like, and cook the patties in a frying pan or in the oven according to packet directions. In the meantime, slice open your bread roll and add either pesto, hummus or guacamole to the base. Add your cooked patty to the bread roll, and top with some sliced tomato, grated beetroot and carrot and sliced pineapple. And voila, it’s completed!

Vegan Mediterranean pizza

This is a super easy vegan lunch to prepare. You can make it the night before or that day if you are at home. Purchase a vegan pizza base and a vegan tomato paste from your local health shop. Brush your pizza base with the tomato paste (or simply olive oil or pesto if you don’t have vegan tomato paste). Add some olives, sun-dried tomatoes, cherry tomatoes (halved), sliced mushrooms, some thinly sliced red onion and a few dollops of pesto. Next, you can either

Simple Recipes For Fish

Baked crusted fish fillet

You can use any tender, white fillets for this recipe. You may also use salmon if you wish. Pre-heat your oven at 350-420 degrees. On a baking dish, place your fillets and sprinkle both sides with salt and pepper. Drizzle with olive oil and juice of half a lemon. You may want to use some garlic or onion powder for added flavor. Rub both sides with this mixture to coat and flavor the fish all over.

Prepare the crust by mixing almonds, fresh bread crumbs, salt and pepper. Spread the crust on top of the fillets before popping the baking dish in the oven. Cook this dish for 10 to 15 minutes or until the fillets are tender and flaky.

You can serve this dish with steamed vegetables and rice or dinner roll.

Baked fish n’ chips

The classic fish n’ chips is usually deep-fried in hot oil, but you can go healthy by baking the ingredients instead. You can use any tender fish that’s cut into long thick strips. Use baking potatoes with their skins on and cut into wedges.

Flavor the fish with salt and pepper

Chai Tea Latte Cupcakes

I looked all over the internet and in a lot of my many books to find some inspiration. Would it be sweet or savoury? Soothing and creamy or hot and spicy? I eventually married together 3 different recipes to make these perfect little treats for after the curry. Chai Tea Latte cupcakes with Cardamom frosting. The recipes were adapted from Woman’s Weekly – gluten free basic cupcake mix. A lovely recipe for Chai Latte mini cupcakes by Geniale Genie on food.com and the frosting recipe was from the stunning book by Eric Lanlard and Patrick Cox, Cox Cookies and Cake. I made some adaptations to the flour mixture to allow the cooked sponge mix to be robust enough to soak up some alcoholic syrup. Of course! I also added some crushed cardamom seeds to the frosting, this worked really well and gave the cupcakes a whole new dimension.

Instructions
Pre heat the oven to 190c or gas mark 5.

Boil half a mug of milk until it reaches boiling point. Take the milk off the heat and add 2 chai teabags. Leave the tea bags to steep in the hot milk for 10 minutes.

Melt

Herbal Teas

Rosehip will help raise your immunity as it is full of Vitamin C.

Ginger is well known for helping nausea and to settle the stomach but it is also good for colds and flu.

Chamomile will help you sleep better as it calms your nervous system. It is also good for digestion.

Green tea has become a substitute for normal black tea with many people. Green tea will help boost your immunity as it is an anti-oxidant. If the taste is not to your liking then add a bit of lemon to give it a bit of a lift.

Fennel is a great tea to help you with controlling that sweet tooth. It tastes like liquorice so it can satisfy your cravings for sweet feeds as well as help suppress your appetite.

Lemon grass tones your skin and is also good for digestion and fever.

Peppermint is a great stomach tea for digestion and to help with bad breath, congestion and fluid buildup. Peppermint is a stimulant so is a great tea to have in the mornings instead of that cup of coffee.

Spearmint is a good stand in for peppermint

Healthy Bones Need Vitamin D

Many of us associate a good dose of sunshine with the best way to replenish supplies of vitamin D. When our skin is exposed to sun, we absorb ultraviolet B rays that the body uses to convert cholesterol into vitamin D. All you need is about ten minutes of direct, midday sun exposure when the sun is high to get a good healthy dose of vitamin D. Excessive cloudiness, long cold wintry days and concerns about excessive skin exposure to ultraviolet rays means we need to make sure we find adequate supplies of vitamin D in our diet. In addition, vitamin D is fat-soluble so it is important to make sure your diet includes essential fatty acids like Omega-3, extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil and butter.

The best natural food sources for vitamin D are the fatty fishes including, salmon, shrimp, tuna, sardines and swordfish. The next good sources are dairy products including milk, cheese, yoghurt and eggs. Some fortified products, specifically juices and breakfast cereals, are boosted with vitamin D. The benefit of this may be more than offset by the amount of sugar or wheat gluten included in those products. Please read the label

Make Tomato and Red Pepper Soup

Canned tomato soup is low in calories but high in salt. One cup has 85 calories and 695mg of sodium. This represents 28 percent of the recommended daily value for salt, based on a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet. You’ll receive 17g of carbohydrates, which includes 6g of sugars and no dietary fiber.

With only 2g of total fat, tomato soup provides 2 percent of the daily value for total fat. It contains no cholesterol, 0.36mg of saturated fat and 1.4mg of the healthier unsaturated fats.Here is a basic home made tomato and red pepper soup that is simple and less costly to prepare

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 chicken stock
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil- to garnish
  • Extra virgin olive oil-to garnish
  • 600g ripe tomatoes- quartered
  • 400g tin chopped tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 onion- chopped
  • 2 large red peppers, seeds removed and roughly chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic- chopped

METHOD

  1. Heat the olive oil in a large saucepan.
  2. Saute the onion, peppers and garlic for about 5 minutes.
  3. Add the fresh tomatoes and cook for another 3 minutes.
  4. Add the tinned tomatoes, the stock and a

Virtues of Green Tea

Antioxidants in green tea reduce cancer risk

Since the damage of oxidative stress contributes to the development of cancer, antioxidants generally have a protective effect against this pathology. Observational studies have shown a connection between oolong tea consumption and reduced cancer risk. For example, women who drink the most oolong tea would reduce their risk of breast cancer by 22%, according to a 2006 study. Similarly, a study of 69,710 Chinese women found that oolong tea drinkers had risk of colorectal cancer reduced by 57%.

Green tea would be beneficial against cardiovascular disease

A 2006 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that green tea consumption is associated with a reduction in mortality, including for cardiovascular causes. The study followed 40,000 Japanese aged 40 to 79 over 11 years. Those who drank more than five cups a day of oolong tea had significantly lower risk of death, especially for cardiovascular causes; for example, in women, the risk was reduced by 31% for cardiovascular deaths. Similarly, black tea consumption is associated with a reduction in stroke risk, according to a study published in Stroke. The cardioprotective effect is thought to be related

White Chocolate Raspberry Blondies

The ingredients you will need are:

  • 100g of white chocolate
  • 75g of unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup of all purpose flour
  • 1/3 teaspoon of salt
  • 2/3 cup of granulated white sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 3/4 teaspoon of vanilla essence
  • 1 tablespoon of milk
  • 50g of raspberries
  • cinnamon sugar for the topping
  1. Start by greasing and lining a 9 x 9 inch square baking pan with parchment paper. Preheat your oven to 180┬░Celsius/355 Fahrenheit.
  2. In a heatproof bowl, melt the chocolate and butter together. You can do this by just putting it in the microwave for 20 seconds, then take it out and give the mixture a stir before putting it back in. Keep doing these intervals until the chocolate and butter are melted down to give a lovely, thick sauce. If you overheat the chocolate there could be a chance of it splitting, and you don’t want that. If not, just melt the chocolate and butter in the top half of a double boiler.
  3. In a large bowl, just combine the rest of the ingredients together and give them a mix. The batter should resemble something like a cookie dough, and it will be thick and sticky.
  4. Then add in your melted chocolate, and

Fruit Salad

Fruit salads are very colourful and pleasing to the eye. Depending on the fruit you choose you can create quite a visual impact. I love to use the strawberries in all my fruit salads not only is the strawberry very tasty it also has a very vibrant colour. Other colourful fruits that look great in a fruit salad include blueberries, kiwifruit and green grapes. I love the look of a colourful salad that’s almost too beautiful to eat!

You can use pretty much any fruit in your salad but be aware of fruit that browns and serve accordingly. Fruit such as bananas, pears or apples will start to brown so if you must have these make sure that the salad is served immediately. Better yet, you can make up the salad ahead of time and only add these fruits immediately before serving.

You really don’t need to add anything to the salad as the fruit will release its own juices but there are many dressings that will add more flavour and/or texture. If your salad contains fruit that is already quite sweet you may want to add plain yogurt, some orange or lime zest, or a

Frosted Date Treat

Dates can be eaten straight from the package as a raw snack, or they can be used in recipes. They are a good source of dietary fiber and nourishment, and are fat-cholesterol-sodium free. Often, they are substituted for apricots, nuts, or raisins in varied recipes.

The chopped dates added to salads or desserts are known to accent the dressings used on them. Dates also go well with cheeses, spreads, nuts, chocolate, cocoanut, and bacon; thus, they might be stuffed, topped, dipped, or wrapped with these ingredients.

Furthermore, because the U.S.-grown dates are harvested in the late fall (November), they are associated with the yuletide season. This recipe probably evolved from that season.

Utensils

  • Microwave oven
  • A flat plate or bread-board capable of being micro-waved
  • Small to medium bowl
  • Measuring cup and spoons
  • Stirring spoon and flat spatula
  • Butter knife

Ingredients

  • 1 Eight-oz sealed package of California whole pitted dates having no preservatives added
  • 2 Cups confectioner’s powdered white sugar
  • 1┬Ż Tbs soft or whipped margarine
  • 1 Tsp vanilla extract
  • 3-4 Drops of select food coloring: red, green, yellow, blue, or none
  • 1-2 Tbs milk as needed for final consistency desired
  • 1 Package of shelled whole pecan or walnut halves

Preparation

  1. Place

Low-Calorie Cabbage Diet Soup

Cabbage, cooked and sliced, can be scrumptiously crisp, with a light pleasing taste. Brassicas such as cabbage has hydrogen sulphide, which becomes active during cooking at about the time cabbage starts to become soft. Hydrogen sulphide eventually vanishes, but between those times, cabbage gets its feature rank flavour and smell.

Either heat cabbage quickly, or heat it slow and long, ideally with other foods so that seasons can mix. Cabbage diet soup may contain fiber, protein, Vitamin B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B9, Vitamin K, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorous, Potassium, zinc and most important, vitamin C.

Cabbage has an extensive and diverse story. But, due to the fact that there are a lot of variations of cabbages under the plant genus “brassica”, it is hard to be certain if the kind the Romans and Greeks had is the alike this time’s sphere cabbage or more similar to Chinese cabbage or kale. The sphere cabbages we see now were a valuable vegetable by the Dark Ages, and during the Middle Ages they were plenty, as we can observe in the paintings of that era.

These usually display baskets at market or tables in the kitchen overflowing